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General Idea of the Revolution in the Nineteenth Century Quotes

In this account I shall endeavour as far as possible to adduce facts as proofs. And among facts I shall always choose the simplest and best known: this is the only method by which the Revolution, hitherto a prophetic vision, can become at last a reality.


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  • The general idea of the revolution in the nineteenth century - Pierre-Joseph Proudhon.

His philosophy can be applied to any society, but in the atmosphere of great political upheaval in the mid s, revolution seemed like destiny for France. Proudhon attacks past revolutionaries for failing to achieve a real transformation in society and offers a new path for future generations to follow: the dismantling of government. In its place, he envisions social contracts between all members of society in which they agree to exchanges that are entirely beneficial to both parties.

No one need suffer. No one need be exploited by another.